APRIL 2020

30 April – the female remains on the ledge asleep until 2:45 when the male flies in. There are a few minutes of calling and posturing on the platform until she moves into the box at 3:00 and dozes; the male sleeps on the ledge. At 4:45 she moves towards the eggs and sits over them but does not incubate. She nudges them together 5 minutes later and goes back to the platform. The male walks into the box but as soon as the female returns, he flies out. She follows at 5:05 and he is back a few minutes later and incubates the eggs for a few minutes before returning to the ledge. He flies off as soon as the female arrives at 5:35. She leaves 5 minutes later and he returns moving onto the eggs at 6:10. He flies off 10 minutes later when the female flies in; leaving after 5 minutes. she is back at 6:40 calling. She makes a small scrape on the platform and keeps looking above her into the sky, then flies out. The male lands briefly at 6:55 and returns a few moments later and sits on the ledge. The female flies in at 7:05 and goes into the box. She stands over the eggs and moves a few stones around them until she walks to the platform at 7:20. There is a brief period of calling and posturing between the pair before the male flies off and she follows. He is soon back and gets spooked by a passing pigeon. He has 2 quick flights at 7:55 and another at 8:05. The female flies in at 8:15 and he does a quick flight. She goes into the box for 5 minutes, then stands on the platform until 8:30 when she flies off. The male is back at 8:45 looking well fed. He walks onto the platform at 9:05 calling loudly and looking around the sky. He returns to the ledge 5 minutes later. He flies off at 9:40 when the female arrives also looking well fed. She sits in the corner of the box for 20 minutes then walks towards the eggs. Once again, she stands over them and moves stones around them but does not incubate. She moves to the platform at 10:20 and after some brief calling the male flies into the box. The male incubates 2 of the 3 eggs for 15 minutes then flies out. The female leaves at 10:55 and is back 5 minutes later. The male tries to land but aborts when he sees the female too close to the ledge. He makes a second aborted landing 45 minutes later. She goes into the box and moves the eggs and stones. She then walks to the platform and makes another scrape in the stones. She remains there until the male arrives at 13:10 when she goes to the box. She stands over the eggs but does not incubate. She then moves stones around the eggs and stands over them until 14:00 when both birds fly out. The male is back 5 minutes later but flies off when the female lands and goes into the box standing over the eggs; the male sits on the ledge. There are a few moments of calling and posturing at 15:10 before the female returns to the box. They both fly off 5 minutes later although the male is soon back. The female flies into the box at 15:35 but leaves briefly after 10 minutes. She stands on the platform until 16:05 when she flies off. She is back 5 minutes later and goes into the box calling before moving to the ledge. She flies off at 17:05 and is replaced by the male who goes and incubates the 3 eggs, flying out 30 minutes later. He is back at 17:40 but is off after 10 minutes. The pair arrive back at 17:55, the female going into the box and the male on the ledge. She walks to the platform calling at 18:00 and he flies out. She sits on the ledge preening and watching the sky until flying off at 18:55 to be replaced by the male. He goes into the box when the female returns at 19:35 there is calling and posturing but he flies out after a few minutes and she walks to the platform. She flies off and he flies in at 19:55. He goes into the box a few moments later as she arrives and he covers the 3 eggs. She flies off at 20:25 and he follows immediately. He is back 5 minutes later and goes into the box when she flies in at 20:50. He flies out after a few minutes of calling and posturing. She falls asleep on the ledge at 22:20.

29 April – the female wakens at 5:25 and walks on to the platform and looks out, then moves to the ledge before flying out at 6:00. She is back a few moments later and is startled by something flying overhead and runs into the box. She is back on the ledge at 6:15 and flies out but is back 10 minutes later calling. After another short visit to the box, she is back on the ledge. This happens 3 more times before she flies off at 6:40. The male lands at 6:45 and leaves when the female lands a few moments later. She flies off again at 6:55 and the male lands on the ledge. He goes into the box and incubates the 3 eggs but flies out after 5 minutes. The female flies in at 7:40 and goes into the box but flies out 10 minutes later. She is back at 8:20 and again flies out 10 minutes later. The female returns at 9:15 and goes into the box, flying out after 30 minutes. She is back an hour later and sits on the platform looking around calling then flies off at 11:00. The male arrives with a full crop at 11:05 and covers 2 of the eggs for 30 minutes then moves to the ledge. He flies off when the female arrives at 11:45 but returns to the ledge a few moments later. The female moves some stones around in the back of the box whilst the male remains on the ledge. At 12:35, she pushes the 2 eggs together and tries to incubate them but could not get comfortable so stands hunched over them, the male watching from the ledge. She moves some stones around the 3 eggs at 12:45 and checks the outlying 4th egg. She is back in the corner of the box 10 minutes later. At 13:15, the male goes into the box and has a look at the outlying egg. There is calling between the pair but he quickly leaves, returns to the ledge and dozes. The female brings the 3 eggs closer together at 13:45 but does not try to cover them. The pair fly out together at 15:00. The male returns soon after but makes 2 quick flights before returning to the box and covering the 3 eggs. He flies out as the female flies in at 15:55. She remains on the platform before flying off at 16:15 and the male returns. He flies off at 16:55. The male is back at 17:10 but leaves quickly on the arrival of the female who goes into the box and stands beside the eggs for 15 minutes, then moves to the platform until 18:00 when she is spooked by a passing falcon and runs back into the box, standing over the eggs before moving back onto the platform where she remains until the male arrives at 19:50 and she returns to the box. Once again, she appears to try and incubate the eggs and moves some stones around them. She then goes into the corner of the box. At 20:15, she goes to the 3 eggs again and moves some stones and then makes a scrape before standing looking at the eggs. At 20:25, she moves to the platform and the male flies off; she follows a few minutes later. He is back at 20:30 and remains until 21:05 when the female flies in. She dozes on the platform until 21:45 when she flies out, returning 5 minutes later remaining until midnight at least.

28 April – the female remains on the ledge but at 1:05 another bird flies past and she starts calling. She is now awake and watching carefully. Things seem calm again by 2:45 and she falls asleep. At 4:35, she starts calling again and walks onto the platform, flying off 15 minutes later. The male flies in calling and covers the 3 eggs. He walks to the platform at 5:20 and flies out when the female arrives. She goes into the box for a few moments before returning to the platform and calling. The male lands briefly then flies off and she follows a few moments later. The male is back at 5:35 and covers the eggs. He goes onto the platform at 7:05 and calls before returning to the box, looking out. He then walks to the platform and flies off. The male is back at 7:40 but before he can cover the eggs, the female flies in and he leaves. She visits the box, looks around then returns to the ledge, flying out at 8:05. The male is back immediately but only for a few seconds. He is on the eggs 5 minutes later, goes to the platform at 8:30 and flies out. There was no further activity, possibly due to the heavy rainfall, until 14:26 when the male flies in and covers the eggs. He leaves a few minutes later when a rather bedraggled, wet female lands. She goes into the box and calls [how did the male stay so dry?]. She starts to move some stones around 30 minutes later. At 15:15, she moves some stones from around the three eggs then pushes the eggs closer together with her foot. She goes to the fourth egg and has a look but ignores it. She returns to the 3 eggs and preens herself. At 15:30, she walks to the ledge and sits looking out until 17:35 when she flies off. The male returns a few minutes later and covers the eggs. He flies out at 18:45 and the wet female flies in 5 minutes later. Initially she goes to the eggs but then moves into the corner of the box. She flies out at 19:25 returning at 20:45 and goes into the box and sits beside the eggs and falls asleep.

27 April 2020 – Video: after 2 hours and 15 minutes, this is how the battle between two females ended.
27 April 2020 – Video: our resident female defends the nest site against an intruding younger female. Here is a short section from the start of the fight.

27 April – so, here goes, this is the best I can make out of all that happened today: the male flies in at 3:15 and sits on the ledge calling but the female does not move. It is not until he flies out 10 minutes later that she turns to look out of the box. She then walks to the platform and calls out. He comes in to cover the eggs at 3:35 and there is calling between the pair. She sits on the ledge and preens and dozes. They start calling again at 5:00 and he flies out and she resumes incubation at 5:10. She runs onto the platform and is quickly joined by the male. He flies off and she sits on the ledge looking around, watching then flies off a few minutes later. At 6:50 the male lands but takes off immediately as the female arrives and rushes into the box calling loudly and looking into the sky. She then moves to the platform at 7:00 all the time calling. She walks around the box completely ignoring the eggs then returns to the platform. This circuit she does a couple of times all the while calling loudly. She is back in the box at 7:40 and makes a scrape close to the eggs before sitting on the ledge. She does another circuit of the box at 7:55 still calling then flies out at 8:00. The male lands briefly but flies off when the female arrives a few moments later. Another circuit of the box then flies out at 8:15. The male flies in at 8:25 and covers the eggs that have been exposed since 5:15. He leaves abruptly at 10:55 with the arrival of the female. She calls loudly and walks to the back of the box. A few minutes later the intruding bird arrives and starts a massive confrontation between the two females. One of the most vicious but compelling spectacles I have witnessed in the natural world (not for the faint hearted) The birds appear very evenly matched and both have the other on their backs during the contest. Each marks the other in the chest with their talons and the intruder has blood drawn. They call loudly and aggressively throughout. Feathers fly everywhere and the eggs are knocked about like alley skittles. Surprisingly, they did not appear to have been damaged by the ordeal. There are large periods where their feet were interlocked as this is a Peregrine’s most lethal weapon. They try to gouge out eyes and the killer blow of a bite in the back of the neck is attempted on a number of occasions. There are periods where the pair broke free and posturing and even seem to be playing tactics hoping to catch the other off guard. Two hours and 15 minutes later and they are still interlocked. The resident female manages to force the intruder backwards out of the box. However, neither will release their grip and they tumble off the platform with talons still interlocked. The resident female is back 10 minutes later and after a quick visit to the box stands on the platform looking out and preening, flying off at 13:30. The male is back 15 minutes later and covers 2 of the 4 eggs after checking the 2 that were most displaced. He checks them again at 14:10 and tries to push one closer to the other two and eventually gets it under his tail, partly covered. Ten minutes later, the resident female arrives and as she does so, another falcon flies by. The male leaves and she is quite aggressive towards him calling loudly. The male lands suddenly and calls loudly and there is posturing between the pair for a couple of minutes. The female then moves towards the eggs and pulls the three closer together. She then starts a new scrape close to the eggs. The male flies off and she walks to the platform and calls. After a few moments, the male flies in and there is more calling and posturing. The female goes back into the box and shuffles the eggs but does not cover them. The male sits on the ledge whilst the female dozes in the box. There is more posturing and calling at 15:05 and then the female goes to the back of the box and chips quietly, the male remaining on the ledge. he flies off a 15:15 and the female ambles to the platform then flies out. The male is back 5 minutes later and is buzzed by another falcon as he defends the platform. The female flies in a few moments later and the male leaves. she flies out at 15:30. They swap places a few moments later but she soon leaves. he is back at 15:45 and covers 2 of the 4 eggs noting the 3rd closest but leaving it in situ. The female flies in at 16:10 and there is posturing and calling between the pair. The male then flies out and she follows at 16:30. The male flies in but is quickly displaced by the female. She goes into the box calling but pays little regard to the eggs but starts a scrape close by. She is back on the platform at 16:40 and flies out. The male returns at 16:50 and covers the same 2 eggs. He leaves when the female returns at 17:20. Once again she makes a scrape in the stones then flies off. The male is back at 17:40 and again covers just 2 eggs. He was to the platform at 18:05 but soon returns to the eggs. He goes to the most distant egg and checks it out, leaving it where it is but manages to push the third egg towards the other two. The female takes over at 18:20 but does not incubate but moves to the platform and looks out. She makes a trial scrape on the platform and flies off at 18:55. The male flies in and goes straight on to the eggs. At 20:35, the female arrives and the male leaves. She makes another test scrape in the stones in the dark. She then walks to the platform calling before sitting on the ledge and falling asleep. *It is interesting how the male is still trying to incubate the eggs and the female is looking to generate a new scrape. He is still hopeful; she knows the eggs are not viable. However, the fact that she is still making a scrape means she may be considering a second clutch. In 2017 she produced 2 clutches after the first failed and that was laid in by 7 May – so not too late? Fingers crossed.

26 April – the male arrives at 4:40 and there is a changeover and the female sits on the ledge. She is looking rather agitated and swaps sides to look over the city. The male flies out at 5:50 and the female goes to cover the eggs but returns to the platform and flies out. The male is back quickly to cover the eggs but soon makes a short flight before returning to the scrape. He checks the platform looking for the female at 7:45 but then returns to continue incubation. The female is back at 9:35 looking rather dishevelled and the male flies out. She does not go to cover the goes but calls loudly from the platform the flies off at 10:10. The male is back at 10:55 and continues incubation. The female lands at 11:20 and the male flies off. Again, she sits on the ledge rather than incubate the eggs. The male is back at 13:20 calling loudly and looking skyward; something is causing the pair consternation. He makes a quick flight and returns still calling. He is off again a few minutes later, the female remaining on the ledge. he is back at 13:55 and both birds are calling. The female suddenly dashes into the box but does not incubate but rather stands over the eggs looking out. The male stands on the platform and raises his tail and there is a brief sighting of a passing intruding Peregrine and he flies off in chase. The female runs to the platform and follows. The male returns at 14:05 and covers the eggs. The female is back at 16:45 but looks like she has been in a bit of a battle; many of her breast feather are displaced. She goes to incubate the eggs 20 minutes later and settles down for the evening after a dramatic day.

25 April – the male arrives at 5:20 and there is a changeover. The female is back at 6:30 and stands on the ledge calling agitatedly which sets off the male. He remains on the eggs and the female flies off. A few minutes later, he walks to the platform and looks around whilst calling, then returns to the scrape. the female returns at 7:15 and after spending a few minutes looking around from the ledge, takes over incubation. She walks out onto the platform at 8:00 but does not call and soon returns to the eggs. At 8:25, she rushes to the ledge, calls and flies out; the male arrives to continue incubation. The female is back a few minutes later and sits on the ledge calling to the male. He chunters back to her and she flies off. At 10:10, a white Feral Pigeon lands on the platform and walks along the ledge for a few moments before flying off. The female lands abruptly at 10:15 and looks out over the city calling loudly – the male flies out. She stands in the box for a few moments, then flies out. The male returns to resume incubation. She is back at 12:50 and takes over. At 14:25, she walks to the platform and looks out into the sky calling occasionally. She starts to walk back to the eggs but is distracted and starts calling loudly. She returns to the eggs after 5 minutes, still calling. A Stock Dove lands briefly at 14:45. The male is back at 15:55 and there is calling between the pair and there is a changeover. The female returns at 18:30 and the male flies out. However, the female does not go into the scrape immediately but sits on the ledge looking out over the city. She flies off at 19:05 and the male arrives 5 minutes later and covers the eggs. She is back at 19:50 and takes over but just a few minutes later, flies out and the male flies in to incubate. However, at 20:15 he too flies off, returning 5 minutes later. The female returns at 20:55 and covers the eggs for the evening after a very eventful day.

24 April – at 5:20, the female walks to the ledge and calls out for a few moments before returning to the eggs. The male arrives 15 minutes later and there is a changeover. The female takes a brief flight but returns to the ledge but flies off 5 minutes later. The male walks to the platform to watch her then returns to his duties. The female returns at 8:20 with a full crop and takes over incubation. Once again, something attracts her attention in the sky and she runs to the platform calling. She sits on the ledge leaving the eggs looking out and calling until the male arrives and takes over incubation. She then flies off, returning at 10:55 to resume duties. The male is back at 13:30 and there is a changeover. At 14:25, the male runs to the platform and calls loudly and the female lands quickly. They both look around for a few moments then the male flies off. She watches him go then covers the eggs. The female runs to the ledge at 15:20 and flies out but the male soon returns to continue incubation. She is back 2 hours later and takes over from the male for the final change of the day.

23 April 2020 – Video: the pair is agitated probably due to the presence of an intruding bird. The male in particular gets very distressed.

23 April – the male is eager this morning and arrives earlier than normal at 4:40 and the female allows him to take over. She returns 3 hours later to resume incubation. Something catches her eye at 8:20 and she rushes to the ledge and flies out calling; possible intruder again? The male flies in to cover the eggs a few minutes later. He is relieved by a well-fed female at 9:45 but she is disturbed from her duties 10 minutes later and runs to the ledge calling loudly. After a few moments, she returns to the eggs but before she can settle, she is back on the platform with the male – both birds calling loudly. The male flies off but she is looking very agitated and before she can return to the eggs she turns around and flies out. The male flies in to cover the eggs at 10:05. The male rushes to the ledge at 10:45 and calls loudly. The female flies in but does not go to the eggs immediately but watches the male fly out, then continues incubation a few minutes later; there is obviously an intruder that is causing the pair some consternation. The female sits on the eggs but faces outwards to look over the city. She is keeping a vigilant eye open and at 13:40 walks to the platform, looks around and flies out. The male takes over incubation a few moments later. The female is back at 15:15 and replaces the male. At 19:40, the male drops onto the platform in a rush and almost knocks the female from the eggs. The pair run onto the platform and call loudly. The male goes to incubate the eggs whilst the female flies out. He watches her go, then walks to the platform to look out again. He then returns to the eggs but is back on the platform calling agitatedly at 19:50. The female flies in and he calms down for a few moments before both birds call again. He is very distressed and flies out allowing the female to cover the eggs. By all accounts, a very eventful day.

22 April – the male flies in at 5:20 and takes over duties. The female returns at 7:00 and resumes incubation. There is a very brief visit from a Woodpigeon at 7:25. The male is back at 8:40 but the female does not want to relinquish incubation, so he flies off. He is back at 9:30 and this time the female is receptive to the changeover. She returns at 10:50 and takes over again. At14:00, the female runs to the platform and calls loudly before flying off. She is back on the eggs a few minutes later; it looks as if there is an intruding bird in the area. The male relieves her at 14:55 and she returns again at 16:25 for the final changeover of the day.

21 April – the male flies in at 4:55 and replaces the female. She is back at 6:40 and there is a changeover. The male returns to take over at 9:15 but is relieved by the female at 10:25. A Stock Dove lands briefly at 11:10. There is a further changeover at 11:45 and again at 13:30. The male returns at 16:10 for another changeover and he remains until 19:00 when the female takes over and settles down for the evening.

20 April – the male arrives at 5:20 and there is a changeover. He is replaced at 7:40 and there is another change at 10:30. It is over three hours when the well-fed female returns at 13:40. The male flies in after 3 hours and there is a changeover. The female is back at 19:05 for the last change of the day. She settles down for the evening.

19 April – the male arrives at 5:00 and takes over incubation. The female returns at 6:10 but the male refuses to move and she leaves returning at 6:25 to resume duties. The female flies out at 8:10 and the male takes over and there is a further changeover at 11:15. There is another swap at 13:20 and 10 minutes later, the platform has a visitor, not our usual Woodpigeon but a Stock Dove; it leaves after a few minutes sitting on the ledge. The female is back at 15:35 and takes over. The male is back for a very late shift at 18:00. The female does not resume incubation until 20:20 and settles down for the evening.

18 April – the male flies in at 5:30 and takes over incubation. There is a brief visit from the Woodpigeon at 6:05 and 10 minutes later the female returns to resume duties. There is another brief visit from the Woodpigeon at 6:50. The male is back at 9:55 and the female flies out. There is another quick visit by the Woodpigeon at 11:00. The female returns at 12:40 for the next changeover and is replaced by the male at 14:35. She is back at 16:30 for the last swap of the day.

17 April – the male arrives at 5:10 and there is a changeover. The female returns with a full crop at 8:15 and takes over incubation. The male returns briefly at 10:25 but quickly leaves. He is back at 11:05 and there is a change but just 40 minutes later, the female returns to resume incubation. He returns again at 13:45 and there is a changeover. Two hours later, the female is back and takes over; the last change of the day.

16 April – the male flies in at 5:35 and the female leaves. there is a brief visit from the Woodpigeon at 6:55. The female is back at 7:40 and takes over incubation. The male flies in at 11:00 with the Woodpigeon trying to land at the same time but diverts quickly when it sees the male. There is another change at 12:55 and again at 14:35. The female returns 2 hours later for what should be the final change of the day. However, at 17:00, something upsets her and she starts calling and walks to the platform looks out then flies off. The male flies in to cover the eggs 5 minutes later. She eventually returns at 17:50 and takes over from the male.15 April 2020 – Video: listen to the male calling to the eggs as he approaches to incubate them.

15 April – the male arrives at 4:45 and there is a changeover, but the female remains on the ledge preening and dozing until 5:30 when she flies off. She returns 15 minutes later and takes over from the male. He is back at 7:50 and there is another change and the female flies off. Our neighbourly Woodpigeon flies in 5 minutes later but only stays for a few moments and repeats the visit at 8:25. The female returns at 8:40 but the male refuses to leave the eggs and so she sits on the ledge preening until she decides he’s had his time and forces him from the scrape. He is back at 11:25 and they swap once again. It has been noticeable during the last couple of days, that the male calls to the eggs as he goes to incubate; communicating with the developing chicks. She flies in at 13:10 with a full crop but the male sits tight so she preens for 10 minutes before taking over. At 15:10, something in the sky catches her eye and she runs to the platform looking out and calling before flying off. The male flies in to replace her on the eggs. She is back at 16:15 and a few minutes later they swap for what would normally be the last changeover of the day. However, the male returns at 19:15 and the female flies out. She returns an hour later and settles down for the evening.

14 April – the male flies in at 5:55 and there is a changeover; the female flies off. She returns to replace the male at 7:45. After 2 days absence, our friendly Woodpigeon makes a visit to the platform at 9:00. It pecks at the stones for a few minutes, then flies off. The male is back with a full crop at 13:00 and takes over incubation. The Woodpigeon pays another brief visit at 13:35. The male flies off at 14:20 and the incoming female takes over duties. The Woodpigeon makes another visit 25 minutes later but only stays for 5 minutes. The male is back at 16:05 but the female returns at 17:55 for the final change of the day.

13 April – the male arrives at 5:40 and there is an immediate changeover. At 7:00, the female returns to take over. The male returns 3 hours later and there is another change. There is another change at 12:40 but the next changeover does not happen for 5 hours when the male returns with a full crop. This is a very late swap for the male; by now the female is usually settling down for the evening. The female returns to do the last shift of the day at 19:15.

12 April – the male flies in at 5:25 and there is a changeover. The female is back at 8:00 with a full crop and takes over incubation as the male flies out. He returns, well fed, and there is another changeover at 10:50. The female is back at 12:30 and takes over incubation duties. At 14:05, something in the sky catches her eye and she runs to the platform looking out calling and then flies off; the male flies in to take over incubation. She is back in the scrape at 16:15.

11 April – the male arrives at 5:40 and there is a changeover; the female sits on the ledge preening for 15 minutes before flying off. Our daily Woodpigeon lands at 6:40 but does not stay long. at 7:45, the male runs to the platform and looks out but returns to the scrape after a few moments. The Woodpigeon returns at 7:55 and pecks at the stones on the platform. It leaves quickly as the female falcon arrives at 8:00 and there is another changeover. The Woodpigeon is back at 10:50 but it is a brief visit. The female flies out from the scrape 5 minutes later but returns after a few minutes. She flies out again at 11:45 and is quickly replaced by the male. She returns at 12:30 and there is another changeover with a further change at 14:50. The female is back again at 16:55 for the last change of the day.10 April 2020 – Video: Watch the reaction of the female as two Woodpigeons have a dust-up’ on the platform on Good Friday.

10 April – the male arrives at 6:20 and there is an immediate changeover and the female flies off. She returns for another change at 8:10. At 9:00, the by now daily Woodpigeon, lands on the platform. It walks up and down the platform watched by the unflinching female. A second pigeon joins it 5 minutes later and preens on the ledge. The original bird flies off and the second arrival leaves at 9:15. An hour later, one of the Woodpigeons returns and second bird arrives and tries to mate with it. It refuses and there is a kerfuffle and both birds fly off and still there is no reaction from our sitting female. The male returns at 10:35 and there is a changeover. Two Woodpigeons land at 10:45 but only stay for a minute or two; our male ignores them. They are back one is back at 11:05 but flies off quickly, then again at 11:15, and 11:35, each time only remaining for a short time. Our male is not phased and there is another changeover at 12:35. There is another brief visit from a Woodpigeon at 13:40 and at 14:30, one walks along pecking at the stones. It settles down on the corner of the ledge looking over the city for 15 minutes before flying off. The next changeover is at 16:25 and a few minutes later there is another short visit for a Woodpigeon. At 19:10, the female returns for the last change of the day.

9 April – the male arrives at 4:35 and there is a changeover and the female flies out 10 minutes later. She returns at 8:40 and the male flies out for the female to take over duties. What is now becoming a daily occurrence, the Woodpigeon lands at 11:10 and walks around the platform for a few minutes before flying off. The male returns at 11:55 and there is a quick changeover; the female flies off. She returns an hour later well fed with a full crop and there is another quick change. The male is back at 16:00 for another change, quite late for him, and she flies off. The female is back at 17:30 for the final change of the day and she settles down for the evening.

8 April – the male flies in at 5:25 and there is a changeover. The female sits on the ledge preening until 6:05 when they swap again; the male flies off. Two hours later she walks to the platform and looks out then returns to the eggs as the male does not show. He returns at 8:20 and they changeover and she flies off. It appears that yesterday’s Woodpigeon is still feeling brave as it lands on the platform at 10:00 and pecks at the stones. The male watches but is unmoved. The Woodpigeon leaves in a hurry ten minutes later as the female flies in to take over incubation and the male flies off. He is back at 13:05 and there is a changeover. The female sits on the ledge for a few minutes before flying off. She returns at 15:20 and the male flies out as she takes over and settles down for the evening.

7 April – the male arrives at 5:10 and there is an immediate changeover. The female sits on the ledge until 6:15 when she forces the male from the scrape, and he flies off. He is back at 8:25 and there is another changeover; the female flies out. At 9:45, she is back and the male is once more forced from the scrape and flies off. At 11:20, a Woodpigeon lands on the platform and sits in the sun. a second bird flies in and tries to knock it from the platform but the original refuses to leave. Our female just sits on the eggs watching this all unfold. It walks along pecking at the stones and grit. The female has a bit of a preen and change position on the eggs, all the time keeping an eye on the activity. She changes position again at 12:00 and turns her back on the pigeon but still keeps a look out. The pigeon feels so safe that at 12:15, it has a short preen before continuing to peck amongst the stones. The female changes position again at 12:20 but our Woodpigeon is unperturbed and continues walking along the platform for another 10 minutes before flying off! The male returns at 14:00 but the female does not allow him to take over incubation duties so he falls asleep on the ledge before flying off at 15:25. The female perks up at 16:10 as the brave/foolhardy Woodpigeon flies in again and starts pecking at the stones leaving 5 minutes later. The male returns at 16:25 and there is a changeover and the female flies off. She is back at 18:40 for the final changeover of the day and settles down for the evening as the male flies out.

6 April – the male arrives at 2:30 and falls asleep on the ledge. he is awake at 6:00 and preens until 6:25 when he flies off. He is back at 7:30 and there is the first change of the day. The female flies out briefly but is soon back preening on the ledge. She remains until 9:05 when there is a changeover. The male flies in at 11:00 and there is another changeover and she flies off. The female is back at 12:50, the male flies out and she takes over incubation. The male returns at 15:30 and there is another changeover. The female sits on the ledge preening until replacing the male on the eggs at 16:55; he flies off and she settles down for the evening.

5 April – the male arrives at 4:25 and takes over incubation; the female flies off. She returns at 6:55 and there is a changeover. The male is back at 9:00 and there is another changeover, and again at 10:25, 12:30 and 14:05, the last change of a very quiet day.

4 April – the male arrives at 5:10and falls asleep on the ledge until 6:10 when he flies off. He returns 15 minutes later and there is a changeover and the female flies off. She is back sporting a full crop at 8:40 and there is another change of duties 10 minutes later. She walks to the platform at 9:10, looks around and flies off. The male flies in to continue the incubation. She is back 15 minutes later, well fed with a full crop. She sits on the ledge in the sun for 20 minutes then takes over incubation; the male flies off. At 10:30, she walks onto the platform and looks around the sky, presumably checking on her mate, then returns to the eggs. The male is back at 11:55 and they change over. She remains on the ledge preening until 13:00 when they swap and he flies off. He is back at 15:35 when there is another changeover and she flies off. A Woodpigeon lands briefly at 16:55 but flies off safely just as the female flies in. The male leaves and she takes over on the eggs. At 17:05, a Woodpigeon lands on the platform and walks along the ledge calling for a full 5 minutes. He is joined briefly by a second bird but it flew out quickly. During this time the female sat tight on the eggs and just watched – her priority is the safety of the eggs. She settles down for the evening.

3 April – the male arrives at 4:45 and there is a change of incubation duties. The female sits on the ledge preening before falling asleep. She flies off at 6:20, returning briefly 10 minutes later. She is back again briefly at 7:40 and returns 5 minutes later to take over from the male who flies out. He is back at 11:05 and takes over. The female moves to the ledge then flies off. She returns 2 hours later and there is another changeover. Something upsets the female at 15:15 and she calls loudly before leaving in a hurry ignoring the safety of the eggs – a sure sign of an intruding bird. The male comes in to continue incubation. At 17:10, he walks to the platform and looks up into the sky and calls before flying out. He returns quickly and continues incubation. The female returns at 17:45 and sits on the ledge, flying off 5 minutes later. She is back again at 18:55 and there is the last changeover of the day. She settles down for the evening.

2 April – the male flies in at 3:45 and there is a changeover. She sits on the ledge preening and then falls asleep until 6:00 when she resumes preening. She flies off an hour later. She flies in at 7:55 with fresh Feral Pigeon prey and the male flies out after his stint of 4 hours 10 minutes. She plucks and eats her meal on the platform flying off with the remains at 8:25. The male flies in and resumes incubation and the female is back a few minutes later sporting a full crop. The male flies out and the female takes over incubation. He is back with a full crop at 11:15 and falls asleep on the ledge. at 12:45 the female walks towards the male and there is calling and posturing between the pair before he flies off. She sits on the ledge still calling and after a few minutes leaves; the male soon returns. She is back at 13:25 but does not stay long, returning a few minutes later. She remains on the ledge until 13:40 with there is a swap; the male flies off 10 minutes later. When he returns at 15:05, there is another swap. The female flies off at 15:50 whilst the male continues incubating. She is back at 16:45 and there is the final swap for the day, and she settles down for the evening. The male makes a brief visit at 19:25.

1 April – the male arrives at 4:45 and sits on the ledge whilst the female continues incubation until 6:40 when he flies off. The female runs to the ledge an hour later when he returns with Pigeon prey. He flies off whilst she starts to eat her meal on the platform but when she flies off, he comes in to take up incubation. She returns with her meal a few minutes later and finishes it on the ledge. she stashes the remains by a column at 8:10 at which time he flies out. She takes over in the scrape. he is back at 9:55 and sees the stashed prey which he eats on the platform. She moves to the ledge at 10:50 and he takes over. She walks into the box at 11:25 and calls to the male who flies out. He is back an hour later and sits on the ledge preening until 13:35 when he flies off. He is back 10 minutes later and goes into the box at 14:05 but retreats when the female does not move. He flies off 5 minutes later and is soon followed by the female. He then returns to take over – was this a ploy to replace the female on the eggs? She returns at 14:55 and forces the male from the scrape to the ledge, he then flies off at 14:05. He is back at 16:45 and there is a civilised changeover. The female sits preening on the ledge for 20 minutes when she flies off. She returns at 18:40 and the is the final change of the day. He flies off and she settles down for the evening.

Daily Commentary Archive Link